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Risk Management for Adult Day Care Facilities

Adult Day Care Facility Insurance

Many families are keeping senior members at home rather than choosing an assisted living or other residential health facility. However, families need to continue with their daily activities and need assistance caring for their elderly family member during a portion of the day. Adult care facilities provide this service. It is estimated that there are currently more than 4,000 of these facilities in operation and the number keeps growing. This is due in part to the increased life expectancy and better quality of life of our aging population. As the population of older Americans increases, so does the need for adult day care facilities.

Adult day care facilities provide meals and social activities for seniors. Additionally, medical and health services are available. The facility also administers medicine and provides necessary therapy. Of course, the variety of services increases the range of risk for both the senior participants and the employees.

Common risks associated with adult day care include, but are not limited to:

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Risk Management for Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

Long-Term Acute Care Hospital

There are over four hundred long-term acute care hospitals (LTACH) in the United States that house critically ill patients. Sometimes unresponsive or in comas, patients may live there for months, or even years, sustained by respirators and feeding tubes. Some, such as those recovering from accidents, eventually will leave; other patients will be there for the rest of their lives.

About $26 billion a year is spent on critical care in acute care hospitals in the United States. Some estimate that the number of patients in these facilities has more than tripled in the past decade to 380,000.

The reason for this growth is two-fold:

  1. The increase in our aging population increases the chances of a catastrophic illness like blood sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome that eventually may send patients to acute care hospitals.
  2. Improved medications and medical technologies are keeping people alive longer requiring an increased need for intensive care.

The result is an increase in patients who require nearly constant care; they survive intensive care, but must remain on life-support. They cannot go home and a rehabilitation facility cannot meet their needs.

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Risk Management for Healthcare Clinics

healthcareclinic

Since healthcare clinics treat a wide variety of conditions, including asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension, it is imperative healthcare clinics ensure that patients receive the appropriate level of care. Additionally, many healthcare clinics also provide obstetric care, a high-risk area.

Risk management for healthcare clinics includes any activity, process, or policy designed to reduce liability exposure. This involves all aspects of a healthcare clinics infrastructure and services, including clinical care, financial matters, facility maintenance, fire safety, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Top risk management issues for healthcare clinics are:

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Managing the Unique Risks of Hospice Care

Hospice Care

Volunteers are a necessity in a successful hospice program. With this realization, Federal regulations actually require a specific level of volunteer activity at each hospice receiving Medicare and Medicaid funding. Although these dedicated and caring volunteers are important assets to a successful hospice program, they provide a unique area of risk management.

Liability Issues

In addition to the liability for the acts and omissions of employees, hospices are also liable for acts and omissions of its volunteers. Not only does this liability affect the willingness of hospices to use volunteers, but also volunteers might be reluctant to assume liability. Fortunately, the Federal Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 promoted the idea of volunteer participation by attempting to immunize volunteers at charitable and nonprofit organizations from liability for their acts and omissions if performed within their volunteer duties. The requirements of the act are:

  • If appropriate or required, the volunteer must have been properly licensed, certified, or authorized by the appropriate authorities in the state in which the harm occurred.
  • The harm was not caused by the volunteer operating a motor vehicle for which the state requires the operator to possess an operator's license or maintain insurance.
  • The harm was not caused by willful or criminal misconduct, gross negligence, reckless misconduct, or a conscious, flagrant indifference to the rights or safety of the individual harmed by the volunteer.
  • The volunteer must have been acting within the scope of his or her responsibilities when the act or omission occurred.

However, the statute does not apply to misconduct which:

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Home Health Care Risk Management Part 2 – Risk Associated with Home Health Care

Home Healthcare Commercial Insurance

Home health care provides some unique challenges for those working in this environment. Not only are many of the same risks associated with hospitals and nursing homes present, but household related hazards such as poor air quality, toxic substances, and aggressive pets may also be issues. Additionally, the homecare health setting cannot be controlled. Finally, many home health care providers may have limited training and experience in providing patient safety and there is no direct supervision of their daily activities.

Some of the risks associated with home health care are:

General security/personal safety hazards:

  • Unsafe neighborhoods
  • Violence from patients or family members
  • Potentially dangerous household pets

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