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Highland Risk Services

Establishing Web Presence for Elder Care Facilities

Elder Care Marketing

When we want to know something, we automatically do a Web search. It is quick, convenient, and provides current information. So, when a family needs to find assistance for an aging parent, or senior needs to make plans when they reach their golden years, they search the Web. They conduct searches for available options and the personal experiences of others. An Internet survey conducted by Pew indicated that 8 out of 10 caregivers have Web access, and 90% of those individuals use it for finding health information for someone else. Since seniors, their families, and caregivers utilize this resource, it makes sense for those providing elder services to create a professional, personal, and positive on-line presence.

A recent survey conducted by G5, a provider of services to senior living facilities, indicated that 75% of consumers do not trust what companies say about themselves; consumer reviews are twelve times more likely to be trusted. For this reason, a facilities website should not only include client’s positive comments and news articles related to the service you provide, but also objective informational content from external sources.

Medicare Requirements for Skilled Nursing Facilities

Skilled Nursing Facilities Insurance

In order to provide the best service to your clients, it is necessary to know Medicare Requirements for skilled nursing facilities. The nursing home reform law, the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1987 (OBRA '87), and Advancing Excellence in America's Nursing Homes (a campaign launched by a coalition of consumers, health care providers, and nursing home professionals), as well as other campaigns serve as the foundation for the Medicare Five-Star Quality Rating System.

In order to assess the rating of a skilled nursing facility, three sources of data are used:

Risk Management for Healthcare Clinics

healthcareclinic

Since healthcare clinics treat a wide variety of conditions, including asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension, it is imperative healthcare clinics ensure that patients receive the appropriate level of care. Additionally, many healthcare clinics also provide obstetric care, a high-risk area.

Risk management for healthcare clinics includes any activity, process, or policy designed to reduce liability exposure. This involves all aspects of a healthcare clinics infrastructure and services, including clinical care, financial matters, facility maintenance, fire safety, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Top risk management issues for healthcare clinics are:

Risk Management for Healthcare Staffing Agencies

healthcare staffing agency insurance

Healthcare staffing agencies employ physicians, nurses, medical technicians, and healthcare professionals to work as contractors. Some major liability issues need to be taken into consideration due to a healthcare staffing agency’s operational dynamics.

  • Contracts may transfer risk or responsibility to the agency.
  • The agency ultimately lacks control over the day to day operations of the health care setting, which includes setting’s standards and policies; their coordination of services, and records; the quality of their other workers; and compliance with regulations.
  • Maintaining a positive relationship with the contracted client can often influence not only the staffing agency’s ability to report or address areas of concern and adverse events; the ability to investigate; but also the agency’s ability to defend itself.
  • If there are liability issues, it may be difficult to coordinate a defense because there are multiple defendants.

In order to meet the risk management needs of a healthcare staffing agency, there are some best practices for your healthcare staffing agency.

Risk Management for Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals

Long-Term Acute Care Hospital

There are over four hundred long-term acute care hospitals (LTACH) in the United States that house critically ill patients. Sometimes unresponsive or in comas, patients may live there for months, or even years, sustained by respirators and feeding tubes. Some, such as those recovering from accidents, eventually will leave; other patients will be there for the rest of their lives.

About $26 billion a year is spent on critical care in acute care hospitals in the United States. Some estimate that the number of patients in these facilities has more than tripled in the past decade to 380,000.

The reason for this growth is two-fold:

  1. The increase in our aging population increases the chances of a catastrophic illness like blood sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome that eventually may send patients to acute care hospitals.
  2. Improved medications and medical technologies are keeping people alive longer requiring an increased need for intensive care.

The result is an increase in patients who require nearly constant care; they survive intensive care, but must remain on life-support. They cannot go home and a rehabilitation facility cannot meet their needs.

Expertise and Creative Solutions

for Healthcare Facilities