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Allied Health Care Experiences Continual Growth

Allied Health Professional

Allied health care includes professionals – excluding doctors, nurses, dentists, and podiatrists – serving in medical facilities and occupations. The majority of healthcare workers serve in the 85 different professions identified as allied health. According to a University of California study, about 60% (8.4 million jobs) of all healthcare workers are in allied health professions, and this number continues to grow.

Reasons for the Growth of Allied Health Care

  • The aging baby boomer population - The eighty million seniors referred to as the baby boomer generation are beginning to reach retirement age. This is influencing allied healthcare by creating many openings in the industry. Additionally, baby boomers will need more health care as they age.
  • Increased longevity - Due to the improved quality of medical care, seniors are expected to live longer. This leads to an increased need for allied healthcare workers.
  • Shortage of doctors and nurses - In the next fifteen years, we will see a shortage of doctors and nurses, driving a need for more allied health professionals to provide necessary specialized services.
  • Advances in technology - Modern medical care is far more advanced than in the past. Now there is a demand for specialization in every health care field. Additionally, as new methodologies and equipment improve medical care; specialized positions will continue to be added.
  • National emphasis on the importance on wellness and need to reduce high obesity rate - As the United States pursues preventative and corrective measures to make our population healthier, more allied healthcare professionals, such as nutritionists, will be needed.

Establishing Web Presence for Elder Care Facilities

Elder Care Marketing

When we want to know something, we automatically do a Web search. It is quick, convenient, and provides current information. So, when a family needs to find assistance for an aging parent, or senior needs to make plans when they reach their golden years, they search the Web. They conduct searches for available options and the personal experiences of others. An Internet survey conducted by Pew indicated that 8 out of 10 caregivers have Web access, and 90% of those individuals use it for finding health information for someone else. Since seniors, their families, and caregivers utilize this resource, it makes sense for those providing elder services to create a professional, personal, and positive on-line presence.

A recent survey conducted by G5, a provider of services to senior living facilities, indicated that 75% of consumers do not trust what companies say about themselves; consumer reviews are twelve times more likely to be trusted. For this reason, a facilities website should not only include client’s positive comments and news articles related to the service you provide, but also objective informational content from external sources.

Highland Risk Services Announces Cynthia Richey, Executive Vice President, retires as of August 2015

Highland Risk Services Announces Cynthia Richey, Executive Vice President, retires as of August 2015

After 7 years of amazing service, Cynthia Richey has retired from Highland Risk Services. Cynthia has been with us since 2008, and her industry experience and hard work were an instrumental part in Highland Risk Services’ growth into the company you now know. We will continue to meet and exceed Cynthia’s exceptional quality of work, and we promise to take care of the relationships she has worked so hard to foster for Highland.

Cynthia’s other passions included work for her church. She was instrumental in starting the Recreational Outreach Center specifically servicing at-risk youth striving towards higher education. She has decided to pursue this passion full time, and we are happy to know her talents will be greatly appreciated in her new venture.

Cynthia’s name is synonymous with success, and we ask that everyone thank Cynthia for her support and dedication over the years.

Home Healthcare – At Risk for Fraud and Theft

Home Healthcare Risk Management Insurance

When it comes to home healthcare, fraud and theft are major areas of concern. Every effort must be made to prevent fraud and theft, as occurrences not only affect the well-being of patients, but can also harm a client’s reputation.

Health care fraud occurs when false information is represented as truth. Perpetrators exploit patients by entering into their medical records false diagnoses of medical conditions they do not have, or of more severe conditions than they actually do have. Then bogus insurance claims can be submitted for payment.

Home healthcare fraud claims also involve intentional incorrect billing of Medicare. According to the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP), “An estimated $250 million is lost to purposeful health care fraud each year.” Examples of fraud that may occur include:

Illinois State Regulations for Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted Living Regulations Illinois

Owners of an assisted living facility that houses 17 or more unrelated individuals in Illinois must be licensed by the state. Additionally, 80% or more of the residents must be 55 years of age or older. The facility must also be providing personal and health services twenty-four hours a day with staff assisting with personal needs such as dressing, eating, and hygiene.

Generally speaking, assisted living facilities are not for individuals who require more than one caregiver assisting them in their daily activities. Assisted living facilities are prohibited from admitting residents who pose a threat to themselves and others. Also, residents must need only minimal assistance moving to a safe area during an emergency.

Risk Management: The Best Protection

When an occurrence happens that puts your facility at risk, is not the time to begin to be concerned about risk management. The best protection for your facility considers three areas: 1) good management 2) up-to-date, reviewed personnel policies and 3) well-designed insurance coverage.

Good Management

All the efforts taken to manage a facility well contribute to sound risk management. Fully attentive administrative staff with a wide range of skills may be the most important guard against major risks.

Careful strategic planning and effective supervision helps ensure organizational resources is closely aligned to accomplishing the facility’s mission, and that staff and volunteers are treated fairly and comply with rules and regulations.

Management skills needed for nursing home supervision include:

Telemedicine in Skilled Nursing Facilities

Movement disorders, impaired mobility, and memory loss frequently require the services of a specialist. Traveling can be difficult for patients in skilled nursing facilities. Having direct access to a specialist from the skilled nursing facility or another easily accessible site is preferred.

This year, in a Wall Street Journal, an article discussed how hospitals are using interactive video to give patients better access to medical care. Skilled nursing facilities are an ideal environment to provide patient-centered care with a high standard for quality.

When to Report an Incident in an Assisted Living Facility

An incident report is a form filled out to record details of an unusual event that occurs at an assisted living facility involving a patient. Guidelines usually require an incident report when an event occurs that harms an individual, illustrates a potential for harm, or evidences serious dissatisfaction by patients, visitors, or staff. An example of an incident requiring a report would be if a patient's visiting family member helps him out of bed despite directions to the contrary by staff members and the patient falls and is injured.

Incident reports must be completed promptly with all the circumstances surrounding the event, while the details are

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